We’ve made it to the end of the summer holidays, the children are going back to school, and we return to normal work and family life as we head into the autumn. But with prices going up at seemingly even faster levels, are you getting all the benefits you can claim in relation to your children?

One good example is if you and your partner are earning up to £100,000 between you, then you may qualify for Child Benefit and also Tax-free Childcare if you need it.

What is Tax-Free Childcare?

The Government’s Tax-Free Childcare provides up to £500 every three months for childcare, which amounts to as much as £2,000 a year. If your child is disabled, this rises to up to £1,000 every three months, giving up to £4,000 a year.

The money can be used to fund nursery places, nannies or childminders, and after school or play schemes. If you also qualify for the 30 hours of free childcare, then this is available alongside the Tax-Free Childcare scheme.

To get the benefit, you would need to set up a childcare account, and for every £8 you put into this account, the Government will add £2 up to the limits outlined above. You can get the benefit if you are working, on sick or annual leave or on maternity or paternity leave, adoption leave or shared parental leave.

You would also need to be earning at least the National Minimum Wage for at least the next three months, which is equivalent to £1,967 for those over 23.

How old must your child be?

This benefit is available to any child up until they reach age 11, and they will stop being eligible on September 1 after their 11th birthday. For disabled children, this rises to 17 but your child must get Disability Living Allowance, the Personal Independence Payment, Armed Forces Independent Payment, or the Child Disability Payment in Scotland or the Adult Disability Payment in Scotland, according to Gov.uk. They would also qualify if they are certified as blind or severely sight-impaired.

Child Benefit can be claimed for children up to the age of 16 – or up to 20 if they remain in approved education or training, which would include A Levels, T Levels, Scottish Highers, NVQs and certain traineeships. But if either you or your partner earns more than £50,000 a year, you may be taxed on the benefit. So, check whether you are better off claiming it or not if you are reaching these thresholds.

Let us help you

If you want to know more about these benefits or any other benefits you may be able to access, then please get in touch on 0114 213 4731 or hello@velocityas.co.uk and we will explain exactly what you can claim and any other benefits you may also not realise you are entitled to.